[Reviews] Death of a Celebrity

Don't skip it if you're a returning fan and invested in the series, but start earlier in the series if that description doesn't yet apply.

[Reviews] Death of a Dustman

Lochdubh is back to normal after a Christmas break.

[Reviews] A Highland Christmas

Think of it as a holiday special. The people of Lochdubh don't require a dead body in order to be worth visiting.

Reviews
Death of an Addict

"Death of an Addict" is rather unlike any of the 14 novels that precede it in the series. It still stars Hamish Macbeth, Scottish police constable, and there certainly are cozy elements, but they mostly bookend a plot that feels more like it belongs in a caper novel.

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Reviews
Death of a Scriptwriter

"Death of a Scriptwriter" is the 14th book in M. C. Beaton's popular series of novels about fictional police constable Hamish Macbeth. Written around the time the series was made into a BBC television series, it in some ways seems like the author's commentary on that ordeal (which she reportedly did not enjoy, due to the many changes that rendered her wonderful source material difficult to recognize once it was translated to the small screen).

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Reviews
Death of a Dentist

Unless you've had a tooth really give you fits, as I did several times with my wisdom teeth before I got most of them extracted (there remains one yet to go), you can't possibly sympathize with Hamish Macbeth, the Scottish police constable who wakes up with a terrible toothache at the start of "Death of a Dentist." That's okay, though, because you're not alone. Anyone he talks to in Lochdubh hardly seems to care, either.

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Reviews
Death of a Macho Man

In "Death of a Nag," M. C. Beaton's 11th installment in her series of mystery novels about Scottish police constable Hamish Macbeth, the author tackled the cozy manor house mystery novel directly. The result was one of the best books in the series to date. Now, in "Death of a Macho Man," she takes a more action-packed approach, similar at times to something like you might expect from someone like Robert B. Parker or Robert Crais.

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Additional Articles:

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